April 11 & 12, 2019

Utrecht, The Netherlands


Conference 2019



Data is numbers, facts, true, bold. When we communicate data to an audience in a visual way, we need to add an emotional layer of design to convince the audience, to guide them, to attract them, to make them click. How can design choices help to add emotion to raw data? How do we bring the story across? How can we feel the numbers?

The S-H-O-W conference exists of two parts: a conference (afternoon) and workshops (the next day). Both events take place in Utrecht. We invited speakers that will share their expertise and show you how to add that extra layer of emotion to a data visualization. The workshops are hands-on and interactive. They focus on learning new skills or new insights so you are able to make captivating data visualizations. Of course there is enough time to meet other participants and have engaging discussions. The entire conference will be in English.


Schedule


Thursday April 11

12:15 registration
13.00 – 13.10 opening
13:10 – 13.40 Steve Haroz
Bio:
Steve Haroz is a research scientist at Inria in Saclay, France. His research explores how the brain perceives and understands visually displayed information like charts and graphs.

Talk:
How the Brain Perceives and Remembers Quantities. We routinely encounter quantitative visual information in the form of charts, maps and infographics. But the guidelines for creating these visual representations often rely on unsubstantiated opinions and traditions without a clear origin. In his talk Steve will instead briefly introduce the science of how our brain perceives and reasons with visual information. And he will describe how his research takes a more empirical approach to forming visualization guidelines and testing their validity.

13.40 – 14.05 Joost Grootens
Bio:
Joost Grootens is a graphic designer, researcher and educator. His studio SJG designs books, maps, typefaces, spatial installations and digital information environments for publishers, research institutes and museums. Joost Grootens leads the masters programme Information Design at Design Academy Eindhoven, and is a mapping tutor at KADK Copenhagen and Professor Information Architecture at ISIA Urbino. Since 2015 Joost Grootens is PhD candidate at Leiden University researching the blurring of the maker-user divide in current map making practices.

Talk:
More Matter with Less Art. In this age of a super-abundance of information, on the Internet, for example, there is a need of formats that can clearly present enormous quantities of information and subsequently make it manageable. The atlas is a good example of such a format. The work of Studio Joost Grootens explores the atlas format, its meaning in the digital age and its application to disclose maps and non-cartographic subjects.

14.05 – 14.30 Anna Wiederkehr
Bio:
Anna Wiederkehr is an American designer with a background in journalism, interface and visualization design. In her master’s thesis she explored how data visualization could be used to help us communicate and reflect on our emotions. She is currently working as head of graphics at the Neue Zurcher Zeitung.

Talk.
Fine. An exploration in visualizing emotion. Tracking, visualizing and interpreting data has become routine through the myriad of apps, dashboards and devices integrated into our daily lives. Discrete data from the human experience no longer goes uncounted: from the beats of our hearts to the steps of our feet. Abstract data however, where language and numbers are limited, has been largely left untracked and unvisualized. Can topics vital to the human experience collected and conveyed visually? Fine. is an investigation of how emotion visualization could look like and how it could work. It is a systematic exploration of how data visualization could be used to help us communicate and reflect on our experiences.

14.30 – 15.00 break
15.00 – 15.30 Stefanie Posavec
Bio:
Stefanie Posavec is a designer for whom data is her favoured material, with projects ranging from data visualization and information design to commissioned data art. Her personal work focuses on non-traditional representations of data often using a hand-crafted approach. Her work has been exhibited internationally at major galleries including MoMA (New York), CCBB (Rio de Janeiro), the Science Gallery (Dublin), the V&A, the Science Museum, The Southbank Centre and Somerset House (London).

Talk:
Observe, Collect, Drawing : Documenting the world using data. As a designer and artist, Stefanie uses data-gathering and data-visualisation as a design process, taking seemingly 'cold' data and using it to communicate warmer, more subjective messages.

She will highlight the various esoteric and 'outsider' data collection processes and data visualisations that have inspired her to see observation as a form of making/creating, exploring how it both influences her creative practice and also functions as a starting point for making the concept of data more accessible to a wider audience, showing how in an era of ever-increasing data, we all can – through channelling our inner 'anoraks' – start to view data through a warmer, more human-focused lens.

15.30 – 16.00 Benjamin Wiederkehr
Bio:
Benjamin Wiederkehr is an Interaction Designer with a focus on information visualisation and interface design. With his work, he explores opportunities to innovate through the combination of design and technology, to simplify complex data in order to raise awareness, as well as to tell stories with an open intent and meaningful impact. Benjamin is the founding partner and managing director of Interactive Things, a design and technology studio in Zurich (Switzerland).

Talk:
Design Against Violence Globally, hundreds of millions of people suffer from interpersonal violence including child maltreatment or sexual abuse. Reliable information on this is scattered across statistical databases, technical reports, and academic journals. Together with the World Health Organization, we've built a platform which combines the existing scientific body of knowledge. This talk shares the learnings from aggregating data from over 3700 scientific studies, spanning 50 years of research, and covering up to 200 countries. It offers advice on how to visualize without bias and how to report without blame.

16.00 – 16.20 break
16.20 – 16.45 Marie Segger
Bio:
Marie Segger works as a data journalist for The Economist. She has an MSc from Goldsmiths College in London and is a former Google News Lab fellow at Spiegel Online. She writes data-driven articles, codes data visualisations and speaks about data journalism and social media.

Talk:
Her talk will focus on how to showcase data journalism on social media, what it means to present complex topics in an attention-driven economy and how we can engage readers on social media beyond quick likes.

16.45 – 17.15 Paolo Ciuccarelli
Bio:
Paolo Ciuccarelli is the founder and scientific director of DensityDesign Research Lab at the Politecnico di Milano. The lab focuses on the visual representation of complex social, organisational and urban phenomena. Co-editor of Big Data & Society (SAGE), his research and publishing activities are concentrated on the development of data, information and knowledge visualisation tools and methods to support decision making processes in complex social phenomena. He recently accepted a position as Professor of Design at the College of Arts, Media and Design (CAMD) of Northeastern University in Boston.

Talk:
How do we make people understand - and act - through data when they don’t master the abstraction of analytical representations? How do we engage stakeholders that are not interested in data or don't want to see it and lack motivation? How do we represents the nuances and the uncertainties of social phenomena that we are now able to capture? How do we reconcile the symbolic description of a phenomenon with the experience we have about it?

A “poetic” approach to data could help answering these questions: there are moments in the data-journey when “feeling" the phenomenon behind the data could be as relevant as accurately “seeing" the data that represent it.

17.15 – 17.20 wrap -up
17.20 – 18.45 drinks

Friday April 12

09.00 registration
Please note that you can choose only one out of the four workshops! You can sign up for one of the workshops at the registration form.

Apart from the regular workshops you can join the pop-up lab in the main hall about data materialisation!

Materialising Emotional Labour
The theme of emotional labour is a topical and popular area for some, and an unknown concept for others, and for many - a felt concept never articulated. The idea fits with the interest in representing abstract data, ie the 'non-collectable' data but could equally translate into means for responding to collectable data for those who want to use their own datasets.

By animating and materialising emotion we can acknowledge impact of unseen data. The brief asks if we can collect this seemingly non collectable, non quantifiable data and give it weight, through sensory engagement in material form. The idea here is that these issues that we feel very heavily (on our souls) known as emotional labour could be reformed externally, and perhaps repurposed, say you got a €, or an inch of chocolate for every time you thought about Brexit.

This switches around the idea that the presence of data can affect our emotions, and instead challenges how emotions as data can take form and affect ourselves in potentially positive ways. The brief has a playful proposal that I hope participants will be able to engage with on a drop-in or longer basis- to discuss the ideas, to ideate and to make.

More information about the pop up lab can be found in the section of the workshops.
09.30 start workshops
Workshop 1 (this workshop is already fully booked)
Stefanie Posavec
Data Charcoal Sketching


How would your approach and sensibility within a data-driven project change if you started exploring visualisation approaches through sketching with charcoal instead of using code or spreadsheet software?

The workshop begins by providing a basic overview of data visualisation as seen though the lens of drawing. Participants then undertake a series of timed drawing exercises where they work with the constraints inherent in a single stick of black charcoal, applying techniques found in traditional drawing classes to data visualisation, culminating in the creation of a sketch of a class dataset.

By the end of this workshop, participants learn to be fearless when working with data as well as how to sketch and iterate quickly when creating custom data visualisation designs (even if they move onto computer / into code at a later point!)

The entire workshop will be off-screen, using nothing more than black charcoal and newsprint.

Bio:
Stefanie Posavec is a designer for whom data is her favoured material, with projects ranging from data visualization and information design to commissioned data art. Her personal work focuses on non-traditional representations of data often using a hand-crafted approach. Her work has been exhibited internationally at major galleries including MoMA (New York), CCBB (Rio de Janeiro), the Science Gallery (Dublin), the V&A, the Science Museum, The Southbank Centre and Somerset House (London).


Workshop 2 (this workshop is already fully booked)
Jan Willem Tulp
Creative Dataviz Design


With so many tools around to create visualisations these days, it's easy to get overwhelmed or being stuck to the defaults. In this workshop, you will learn to think a bit out of the box and step beyond the conventional charts.

By looking at the boundaries of a visualisation project, we will challenge our creative muscles to come up with alternative visualisation designs that will engage and inspire users, and still communicate a clear message.

By using pens and paper, we will sketch different visualisation designs to express our creative ideas. By the end of the workshop, you will have a better idea what the options are to creatively express a dataset visually.

Bio:
Jan Willem Tulp is an independent Data Experience Designer from The Netherlands. With his company TULP interactive, he creates custom data visualisations for a variety of clients. For more than 7 years he has helped clients such as Google, European Space Agency, Scientific American, Nature, and World Economic Forum by creating visualisations, both interactive and in print. His work has appeared in several books and magazines and he speaks regularly at international conferences.


Pop-up lab
Marion Lean
Feels on Wheels


Marion Lean, London based researcher and facilitator is running a series of drop in station exploring the concept of data materialisation and experience. Conference participants are invited to stop by the pop-up lab on wheels to explore how materials can be used as tools to explore emotion and sensory engagement with data. This is an informal opportunity to engage with materials, meet others to consider and discuss novel data experiences and interfaces, generate ideas and maybe even take a prototype home.

Main hall from 10:00-12:00 and 14:15-16:15, workshop activities run from 20 mins to 1 hour.
12.30 lunch
Lunch will be served for every participant. If you have followed a workshop in the morning, you can have lunch afterwards. If you follow a session in the afternoon, you can start with lunch.
14.00 start workshops
Workshop 3 (this workshop is already fully booked)
Anna and Benjamin Wiederkehr
Building Systems for Visualizing Human Experience


As information designers we create visuals to guide people through dense and complex subjects. For most of these topics we start with quantifiable data. Others topics however, topics vital to the human experience like pain, memory or emotion are rarely visualized despite their complex nature. Without quantitative data, these subjects don't fit into our systematic structures. So, how could we collect data for these experiences? And how could they begin to be visualized?

In this workshop we will look at some of the challenges with visualizing qualitative - or fuzzy data. After a brief introduction, the participants will each pick a theme that they want to tackle. Then, we'll develop systems for collecting data and use them to create a sample dataset. Finally, we will design systems for visualizing our data as an expression of your topic.

Bio:
Benjamin Wiederkehr is an Interaction Designer with a focus on information visualisation and interface design. With his work, he explores opportunities to innovate through the combination of design and technology, to simplify complex data in order to raise awareness, as well as to tell stories with an open intent and meaningful impact. Benjamin is the founding partner and managing director of Interactive Things, a design and technology studio in Zurich.

Anna Wiederkehr is an American designer with a background in journalism, interface and visualization design. In her master’s thesis she explored how data visualization could be used to help us communicate and reflect on our emotions. She is currently working as head of graphics at the Neue Zurcher Zeitung.


Workshop 4
Steve Haroz
An introduction to visual sensation and perception


Our ability to interpret visual information is easily taken for granted. But optical illusions, misinterpretations, and challenging visual tasks demonstrate that the human visual system is elaborate and often counterintuitive. This workshop will offer a short introduction to how our vision works.

Topics will include:
• the functionality of the eyes and how they pass information to the brain;
• how the brain interprets various properties of a scene, such as size, orientation, and motion;
• how color perception and color blindness occur;
• how attention and higher level reasoning factors occur into the visual system.

This introduction will include many demonstrations and examples. At several points, we will briefly discuss how these principles apply do data visualisation.

Bio:
Steve Haroz is a research scientist at Inria in Saclay, France. His research explores how the brain perceives and understands visually displayed information like charts and graphs.


Pop-up lab
Marion Lean
Feels on Wheels


Marion Lean, London based researcher and facilitator is running a series of drop in station exploring the concept of data materialisation and experience. Conference participants are invited to stop by the pop-up lab on wheels to explore how materials can be used as tools to explore emotion and sensory engagement with data. This is an informal opportunity to engage with materials, meet others to consider and discuss novel data experiences and interfaces, generate ideas and maybe even take a prototype home.

Main hall from 10:00-12:00 and 14:15-16:15, workshop activities run from 20 mins to 1 hour.
17.00 End

Venue



Conference and workshops: Anatomiegebouw

Anatomiegebouw, Bekkerstraat 141, Utrecht
This historical building, once part of the University of Utrecht, was designed by architect Joseph Crouwel. The theater where the conference will take place, was used to host lectures on veterinary anatomy. You can still see the rails in the floor where the bigger animals were brought in.

We recommend to travel by public transport to the Anatomiegebouw. There are several bus connections from the central railroad station in Utrecht to bus stop Wittevrouwen. From here it is only a few minutes to the venue. If you will travel by car, the best option to park your car is at car park Grifthoek.

Routekaart

About



S-H-O-W is organized by Graphic Hunters, a training institute on data visualization.
For questions about the conference, send an E-mail to SHOW@GraphicHunters.nl
Follow us on Twitter / LinkedIn for news and updates on the event.
The entire conference will be in English.

Tickets



The price for the full conference is €245,- ex. VAT.
There are limited tickets for only the presentations on Thursday. The price is €139,- ex. VAT.
If you want to buy this ticket, please add a remark on the registration form.

There are a limited number of seats (100) to the conference.

When you buy the ticket for the full conference, you also need to register for one of the workshops that take place on Friday April 12. There are a limited number of seats for a workshop (20). Apart from the regular workshops, you can always join the pop-up lab in the main hall.

Registration




Registration is not possible at this moment.